Latest Meditation Research

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  • MEDITATION IN THE LITERATURE
      PubMed Abstracts - Some citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites. [Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). NCBI Copyright and Disclaimers]
    • Effects of mindfulness meditation on occupational functioning and health care utilization in individuals with anxiety. -
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      Effects of mindfulness meditation on occupational functioning and health care utilization in individuals with anxiety.

      J Psychosom Res. 2017 Apr;95:7-11

      Authors: Hoge EA, Guidos BM, Mete M, Bui E, Pollack MH, Simon NM, Dutton MA

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of mindfulness meditation on occupational functioning in individuals with Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).
      METHODS: Fifty-seven individuals with GAD (mean (SD) age=39 (13); 56% women) participated in an 8-week clinical trial in which they were randomized to mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) or an attention control class. In this secondary analysis, absenteeism, entire workdays missed, partial workdays missed, and healthcare utilization patterns were assessed before and after treatment.
      RESULTS: Compared to the attention control class, participation in MBSR was associated with a significantly greater decrease in partial work days missed for adults with GAD (t=2.734, df=51, p=0.009). Interestingly, a dose effect was observed during the 24-week post-treatment follow-up period: among MBSR participants, greater home mindfulness meditation practice was associated with less work loss and with fewer mental health professional visits.
      CONCLUSION: Mindfulness meditation training may improve occupational functioning and decrease healthcare utilization in adults with GAD.

      PMID: 28314552 [PubMed - in process]

    • Improving Communication between Physicians and Their Patients through Mindfulness and Compassion-Based Strategies: A Narrative Review. -
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      Improving Communication between Physicians and Their Patients through Mindfulness and Compassion-Based Strategies: A Narrative Review.

      J Clin Med. 2017 Mar 17;6(3):

      Authors: Amutio-Kareaga A, García-Campayo J, Delgado LC, Hermosilla D, Martínez-Taboada C

      Abstract
      Communication between physicians and patients is a key pillar of psychosocial support for enhancing the healing process of patients and for increasing their well-being and quality of life. Physicians and other health professionals might benefit from interventions that increase their self-care, awareness, compassion, and other-focused concern, and reduce the chances of distress and burnout. There is substantial evidence for the contribution of different management strategies to achieve these aims. The goal of this article is to review the potential effect of mindfulness and compassion-based strategies for the improvement of physician-patient interactions. The acquisition of the necessary skills by physicians requires continuous education. Future research will be useful for identifying more evidence on the cost-effectiveness of this type of intervention.

      PMID: 28304333 [PubMed - in process]

    • Use of mindfulness, meditation and relaxation to treat vasomotor symptoms. -
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      Use of mindfulness, meditation and relaxation to treat vasomotor symptoms.

      Climacteric. 2017 Apr;20(2):178-182

      Authors: Goldstein KM, Shepherd-Banigan M, Coeytaux RR, McDuffie JR, Adam S, Befus D, Goode AP, Kosinski AS, Masilamani V, Williams JW

      Abstract
      Postmenopausal women with bothersome vasomotor symptoms (VMS) often seek alternatives to hormone-based treatment due to medication risks or personal preference. We sought to identify the effects of meditation, mindfulness, hypnosis and relaxation on VMS and health-related quality of life in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. To do this, we conducted an umbrella review supplemented by new randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) published since the most recent good-quality systematic review for eligible interventions. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Databases. We identified five systematic reviews and six new RCTs that met eligibility criteria. In a new meta-analysis examining four RCTs comparing paced respiration with a control group, we found that paced respiration is not associated with a statistically significant decrease in VMS frequency (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.73 to 0.82, I(2 )=( )56.6%, three trials) or severity (SMD 0.06, 95% CI -0.69 to 0.80; I(2 )=( )65.1%, three trials). There was not sufficient new information to conduct meta-analyses that examined the effect of mindfulness or hypnosis on our outcomes of interest. No effect on VMS or quality of life was found between various relaxation or mindfulness interventions.

      PMID: 28286985 [PubMed - in process]

    • Yin yoga and mindfulness: a five week randomized controlled study evaluating the effects of the YOMI program on stress and worry. -
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      Yin yoga and mindfulness: a five week randomized controlled study evaluating the effects of the YOMI program on stress and worry.

      Anxiety Stress Coping. 2017 Mar 13;:1-14

      Authors: Hylander F, Johansson M, Daukantaitė D, Ruggeri K

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The YOMI program is a psychoeducational training and physical practice-based program that bridges knowledge from evidence-based psychotherapy with the practice of mindfulness and yin yoga. It consists of 10 content-specific sessions and does not include home assignments. The primary purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effects of the five-week YOMI program on perceived stress, worry and mindfulness in a non-clinical sample.
      DESIGN AND METHOD: In this randomized controlled trial participants were assigned to two groups. Group 1 participated in the five-week intervention twice a week while Group 2 was assigned to a waiting-list condition and participated in the intervention after Group 1. All measures were administered through self-report questionnaires, conducted via a web-based program.
      RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study indicated significant effects of the YOMI program on decreasing stress and worry, and increasing mindfulness. Notably these changes were still present at five-week follow up. Consistent with the hypotheses, results suggested that the YOMI program established a group setting where individuals learned to use tools and methods to facilitate better self-directed practice. The study shows moderate to large effect sizes.

      PMID: 28286971 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Enhancing Visual Perception and Motor Accuracy among School Children through a Mindfulness and Compassion Program. -
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      Enhancing Visual Perception and Motor Accuracy among School Children through a Mindfulness and Compassion Program.

      Front Psychol. 2017;8:281

      Authors: Tarrasch R, Margalit-Shalom L, Berger R

      Abstract
      The present study assessed the effects of the mindfulness/compassion cultivating program: "Call to Care-Israel" on the performance in visual perception (VP) and motor accuracy, as well as on anxiety levels and self-reported mindfulness among 4th and 5th grade students. One hundred and thirty-eight children participated in the program for 24 weekly sessions, while 78 children served as controls. Repeated measures ANOVA's yielded significant interactions between time of measurement and group for VP, motor accuracy, reported mindfulness, and anxiety. Post hoc tests revealed significant improvements in the four aforementioned measures in the experimental group only. In addition, significant correlations were obtained between the improvement in motor accuracy and the reduction in anxiety and the increase in mindfulness. Since VP and motor accuracy are basic skills associated with quantifiable academic characteristics, such as reading and mathematical abilities, the results may suggest that mindfulness practice has the ability to improve academic achievements.

      PMID: 28286492 [PubMed - in process]

    • Cognitive reactivity as outcome and working mechanism of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrently depressed patients in remission. -
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      Cognitive reactivity as outcome and working mechanism of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrently depressed patients in remission.

      Cogn Emot. 2017 Feb 07;:1-8

      Authors: Cladder-Micus MB, van Aalderen J, Donders AR, Spijker J, Vrijsen JN, Speckens AE

      Abstract
      Major depressive disorder is a prevalent condition with high relapse rates. There is evidence that cognitive reactivity is an important vulnerability factor for the recurrence of depression. Mindfulness-based interventions are designed to reduce relapse rates, with cognitive reactivity as one of the proposed working mechanisms. In a randomised controlled trial we compared the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) with treatment-as-usual (TAU) on cognitive reactivity in recurrently depressed patients (N = 115). Depressive symptoms, cognitive reactivity, and mindfulness skills were assessed pre and post treatment. Patients in the MBCT group reported a significantly greater reduction in cognitive reactivity than those in the TAU group (d = .51). The reduction of cognitive reactivity appeared to mediate the association between MBCT/TAU and decrease of depressive symptoms, using pre and post scores. The current study provides evidence that MBCT reduces cognitive reactivity and preliminary evidence that cognitive reactivity is a working mechanism of MBCT.

      PMID: 28278742 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Mindfulness - part 3: don't give up. -
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      Mindfulness - part 3: don't give up.

      Nurs Stand. 2017 Mar 08;31(28):37-38

      Authors: Day-Calder M

      Abstract
      In the first two parts of this series, we looked at what mindfulness is, reviewed some of the main benefits and identified fundamental mindfulness techniques.

      PMID: 28271793 [PubMed - in process]

    • Being While Doing: An Inductive Model of Mindfulness at Work. -
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      Being While Doing: An Inductive Model of Mindfulness at Work.

      Front Psychol. 2016;7:2060

      Authors: Lyddy CJ, Good DJ

      Abstract
      Mindfulness at work has drawn growing interest as empirical evidence increasingly supports its positive workplace impacts. Yet theory also suggests that mindfulness is a cognitive mode of "Being" that may be incompatible with the cognitive mode of "Doing" that undergirds workplace functioning. Therefore, mindfulness at work has been theorized as "being while doing," but little is known regarding how people experience these two modes in combination, nor the influences or outcomes of this interaction. Drawing on a sample of 39 semi-structured interviews, this study explores how professionals experience being mindful at work. The relationship between Being and Doing modes demonstrated changing compatibility across individuals and experience, with two basic types of experiences and three types of transitions. We labeled experiences when informants were unable to activate Being mode while engaging Doing mode as Entanglement, and those when informants reported simultaneous co-activation of Being and Doing modes as Disentanglement. This combination was a valuable resource for offsetting important limitations of the typical reliance on the Doing cognitive mode. Overall our results have yielded an inductive model of mindfulness at work, with the core experience, outcomes, and antecedent factors unified into one system that may inform future research and practice.

      PMID: 28270775 [PubMed - in process]

    • The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma. -
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      The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Feb 28;4(3):

      Authors: Ortiz R, Sibinga EM

      Abstract
      Research suggests that many children are exposed to adverse experiences in childhood. Such adverse childhood exposures may result in stress and trauma, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality into adulthood. In general populations and trauma-exposed adults, mindfulness interventions have demonstrated reduced depression and anxiety, reduced trauma-related symptoms, enhanced coping and mood, and improved quality of life. Studies in children and youth also demonstrate that mindfulness interventions improve mental, behavioral, and physical outcomes. Taken together, this research suggests that high-quality, structured mindfulness instruction may mitigate the negative effects of stress and trauma related to adverse childhood exposures, improving short- and long-term outcomes, and potentially reducing poor health outcomes in adulthood. Future work is needed to optimize implementation of youth-based mindfulness programs and to study long-term outcomes into adulthood.

      PMID: 28264496 [PubMed - in process]

    • Randomized Controlled Trial of Inner Resources Meditation for Family Dementia Caregivers. -
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      Randomized Controlled Trial of Inner Resources Meditation for Family Dementia Caregivers.

      J Clin Psychol. 2017 Mar 06;:

      Authors: Waelde LC, Meyer H, Thompson JM, Thompson L, Gallagher-Thompson D

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled trial examined the comparative effectiveness of 2 interventions for improving diurnal cortisol slope and life satisfaction and reducing stress symptoms among older female dementia family caregivers.
      METHOD: Thirty-one family dementia caregivers were randomized to 8 weeks of Inner Resources for Stress mindfulness meditation and mantra training (IR) or psychoeducation and telephone support (PTS).
      RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant pre-post improvements in diurnal cortisol slope and overall life satisfaction, but not depression or self-efficacy, in the IR relative to the PTS group. Adherence to between-session meditation practice was significantly associated with decreases in depression and self-reported improvements in ability to cope with stress. In addition, IR participants rated the overall benefits of the program more highly than the PTS group.
      CONCLUSION: These results indicate that mindfulness meditation and mantra has promise as a feasible and effective caregiver intervention for quality of life and physiological responding to stress.

      PMID: 28263398 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Effects of five-minute internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy and simplified emotion-focused mindfulness on depressive symptoms: a randomized controlled trial. -
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      Effects of five-minute internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy and simplified emotion-focused mindfulness on depressive symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

      BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Mar 04;17(1):85

      Authors: Noguchi R, Sekizawa Y, So M, Yamaguchi S, Shimizu E

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Notwithstanding a high expectation for internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for reducing depressive symptoms, many of iCBT programs have limitations such as temporary effects and high drop-out rates, possibly due to their complexity. We examined the effects of a free, simplified, 5-minute iCBT program by comparing it with a simplified emotion-focused mindfulness (sEFM) exercise and with a waiting list control group.
      METHODS: A total of 974 participants, who were recruited using the website of a market research company, were randomly assigned to the iCBT group, the sEFM group, and the control group. Those in the intervention arms performed each exercise for 5 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) at postintervention. Secondary outcome measures were the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7). Intention-to-treat analyses were conducted.
      RESULTS: During postintervention assessment, there were no significant differences between the intervention arms and the control group in the CES-D, although the difference between the iCBT arm and control group was close to significance (p = 0.05) in favor of iCBT. There was a significant difference in the PHQ-9 in favor of the sEFM group compared with the control group. There were no significant differences in outcome measures between the three groups at the 6-week follow-up.
      CONCLUSIONS: Although both iCBT and sEFM have the potential to temporarily reduce depressive symptoms, substantial improvements are required to enhance and maintain their effects.
      TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial is registered with the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN-CTR) (ID: UMIN000015097 ) on 1 October 2014.

      PMID: 28259151 [PubMed - in process]

    • [Treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults using virtual reality through a mindfulness programme]. -
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      [Treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults using virtual reality through a mindfulness programme].

      Rev Neurol. 2017 Feb 24;64(s01):S117-S122

      Authors: Serra-Pla JF, Pozuelo M, Richarte V, Corrales M, Ibanez P, Bellina M, Vidal R, Calvo E, Casas M, Ramos-Quiroga JA

      Abstract
      INTRODUCTION: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder, which presents a high comorbidity with anxiety and affective signs and symptoms. It has repercussions on the functioning of those suffering from it, who also have low therapy compliance and generate a significant cost both at a personal level and for society. Mindfulness is a psychological treatment that has proved to be effective for ADHD. Virtual reality is widely used as treatment in cases of phobias and other pathologies, with positive results.
      AIMS: To develop the first treatment for ADHD in adults based on virtual reality and mindfulness, while also resulting in increased treatment adherence and reduced costs.
      PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a pilot study with 25 patients treated by means of virtual reality, in four 30-minute sessions, and 25 treated with psychostimulants. Measures will be taken pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 3 and 12 months post-treatment, to evaluate both ADHD and also depression, anxiety, functionality and quality of life. Data will be later analysed with the SPSS v. 20 statistical program. An ANOVA of independent groups will be performed to see the differences between treatments and also a test-retest to detect whether the changes will be maintained.
      RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to use treatments that are effective, reduce costs and increase therapy adherence. Treatment with virtual reality is an interesting alternative to the classical treatments, and is shorter and more attractive for patients.

      PMID: 28256698 [PubMed - in process]

    • A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Unipolar Depression in Patients With Chronic Pain. -
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      A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Unipolar Depression in Patients With Chronic Pain.

      J Clin Psychiatry. 2017 Feb 28;:

      Authors: de Jong M, Peeters F, Gard T, Ashih H, Doorley J, Walker R, Rhoades L, Kulich RJ, Kueppenbender KD, Alpert JE, Hoge EA, Britton WB, Lazar SW, Fava M, Mischoulon D

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: Chronic pain is a disabling illness, often comorbid with depression. We performed a randomized controlled pilot study on mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) targeting depression in a chronic pain population.
      METHOD: Participants with chronic pain lasting ≥ 3 months; DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymic disorder, or depressive disorder not otherwise specified; and a 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Clinician Rated (QIDS-C₁₆) score ≥ 6 were randomly assigned to MBCT (n = 26) or waitlist (n = 14). We adapted the original MBCT intervention for depression relapse prevention by modifying the psychoeducation and cognitive-behavioral therapy elements to an actively depressed chronic pain population. We analyzed an intent-to-treat (ITT) and a per-protocol sample; the per-protocol sample included participants in the MBCT group who completed at least 4 of 8 sessions. Changes in scores on the QIDS-C₁₆ and 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Sale (HDRS₁₇) were the primary outcome measures. Pain, quality of life, and anxiety were secondary outcome measures. Data collection took place between January 2012 and July 2013.
      RESULTS: Nineteen participants (73%) completed the MBCT program. No significant adverse events were reported in either treatment group. ITT analysis (n = 40) revealed no significant differences. Repeated-measures analyses of variance for the per-protocol sample (n = 33) revealed a significant treatment × time interaction (F₁,₃₁ = 4.67, P = .039, η²p = 0.13) for QIDS-C₁₆ score, driven by a significant decrease in the MBCT group (t₁₈ = 5.15, P < .001, d = >1.6), but not in the control group (t₁₃ = 2.01, P = .066). The HDRS₁₇ scores did not differ significantly between groups. The study ended before the projected sample size was obtained, which might have prevented effect detection in some outcome measures.
      CONCLUSIONS: MBCT shows potential as a treatment for depression in individuals with chronic pain, but larger controlled trials are needed.
      TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01473615​​.

      PMID: 28252881 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Mindfulness - part 2: how to reduce stress. -
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      Mindfulness - part 2: how to reduce stress.

      Nurs Stand. 2017 Mar 01;31(27):35-36

      Authors: Day-Calder M

      Abstract
      Practising mindfulness cannot stop challenging things happening in your life, but it can help you to control your response. Buddhists use an analogy of two arrows to explain this: the first arrow is the actual event which, though difficult or painful, is often outside your control. For example, starting your shift and finding out you are short-staffed yet again. The second arrow is your reaction, which might be to get angry, stressed or grumpy.

      PMID: 28247808 [PubMed - in process]

    • Mindfulness and parenting distress among parents of children with disabilities: A literature review. -
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      Mindfulness and parenting distress among parents of children with disabilities: A literature review.

      Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2017 Mar 01;:

      Authors: Rayan A, Ahmad M

      Abstract
      PURPOSE: The purpose of this review was to determine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for management of parenting distress in parents of children with disabilities.
      DESIGN: A narrative review was conducted. A search protocol was conducted using Google Scholar, EBSCO, Pubmed, CINAHL, Ovid, and PsycINFO databases up to September 1, 2016.
      RESULTS: Interventions used a variety of approaches to implement mindfulness training, including MBIs and combined mindfulness and other interventions. Targeted outcomes included in this review were parenting stress and psychological distress. Most of the reviewed papers reported positive role of MBIs to manage parenting distress.
      CONCLUSION: The results of this first review on the topic provide preliminary support for the efficacy of MBIs for supporting parents of children with disabilities.

      PMID: 28247409 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Cultivating Mindfulness to Promote Self-Care and Well-Being in Perioperative Nurses. -
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      Cultivating Mindfulness to Promote Self-Care and Well-Being in Perioperative Nurses.

      AORN J. 2017 Mar;105(3):259-266

      Authors: Myers RE

      Abstract
      Nursing has long been regarded as a stress-filled profession; the perioperative environment in particular is considered especially challenging. Chronic stress and burnout may have detrimental effects not only on perioperative nurses but also on their coworkers, employers, and patients. Nurses often sacrifice their own needs to care for others. Nurses must first take care of themselves, however, to sustain their optimal ability to provide care for patients. The cultivation of mindfulness is one way that perioperative nurses may promote self-care and well-being. This article discusses mindfulness and its history, the potential benefits and applications to perioperative nursing, and suggestions for cultivating mindfulness. Mindfulness research, practice, and education and the implications of mindfulness meditation in the perioperative environment are also discussed.

      PMID: 28241947 [PubMed - in process]

    • Distress Disclosure and Psychological Functioning Among Taiwanese Nationals and European Americans: The Moderating Roles of Mindfulness and Nationality. -
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      Distress Disclosure and Psychological Functioning Among Taiwanese Nationals and European Americans: The Moderating Roles of Mindfulness and Nationality.

      J Couns Psychol. 2017 Feb 27;:

      Authors: Kahn JH, Wei M, Su JC, Han S, Strojewska A

      Abstract
      Research using Western samples shows that talking about unpleasant emotions-distress disclosure-is associated with fewer psychological symptoms and higher well-being. These benefits of distress disclosure may or may not be observed in East Asia where emotional control is valued. Instead, mindfulness may be more relevant to emotion regulation in East Asia (e.g., Taiwan). In the present study, cultural context (Taiwanese nationals vs. European Americans) and mindfulness were examined as moderators of the relation between distress disclosure and both depression symptoms and life satisfaction. A sample of 256 Taiwanese college students and a sample of 209 European American college students completed self-report measures in their native language. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed significant interaction effects of mindfulness and distress disclosure on both depression symptoms and life satisfaction for Taiwanese participants but not for European Americans. Specifically, distress disclosure was negatively associated with depression symptoms and positively associated with life satisfaction for Taiwanese low in mindfulness but not for Taiwanese high in mindfulness. For European Americans, distress disclosure was not associated with depression symptoms but was associated with higher life satisfaction, regardless of one's level of mindfulness. These findings suggest that the potential benefits of disclosing distress are a function of one's cultural context as well as, for those from Taiwan, one's mindfulness. (PsycINFO Database Record

      PMID: 28240918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Complementary Tools to Empower and Sustain Behavior Change: Motivational Interviewing and Mindfulness. -
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      Complementary Tools to Empower and Sustain Behavior Change: Motivational Interviewing and Mindfulness.

      Am J Lifestyle Med. 2016 Nov;10(6):429-436

      Authors: Sohl SJ, Birdee G, Elam R

      Abstract
      Improving health behaviors is fundamental to preventing and controlling chronic disease. Healthcare providers who have a patient-centered communication style and appropriate behavioral change tools can empower patients to engage in and sustain healthy behaviors. This review highlights motivational interviewing and mindfulness along with other evidence-based strategies for enhancing patient-centered communication and the behavior change process. Motivational interviewing and mindfulness are especially useful for empowering patients to set self-determined, or autonomous, goals for behavior change. This is important because autonomously motivated behavioral change is more sustainable. Additional strategies such as self-monitoring are discussed as useful for supporting the implementation and maintenance of goals. Thus, there is a need for healthcare providers to develop such tools to empower sustained behavior change. The additional support of a new role, a health coach who specializes in facilitating the process of health-related behavior change, may be required to substantially impact public health.

      PMID: 28239308 [PubMed - in process]

    • Effects of mindfulness-based interventions on biomarkers in healthy and cancer populations: a systematic review. -
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      Effects of mindfulness-based interventions on biomarkers in healthy and cancer populations: a systematic review.

      BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Feb 23;17(1):125

      Authors: Sanada K, Alda Díez M, Salas Valero M, Pérez-Yus MC, Demarzo MM, Montero-Marín J, García-Toro M, García-Campayo J

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Only a small number of articles have investigated the relationship between mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) and biomarkers. The aim of this systematic review was to study the effect of MBIs on specific biomarkers (cytokines, neuropeptides and C-reactive protein (CRP)) in both healthy subjects and cancer patients.
      METHODS: A search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Cochrane library between 1980 and September 2016.
      RESULTS: A total of 13 studies with 1110 participants were included. In the healthy population, MBIs had no effect on cytokines, but were found to increase the levels of the neuropeptide insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). With respect to neuropeptide Y, despite the absence of post-intervention differences, MBIs may enhance recovery from stress. With regard to CRP, MBIs could be effective in lower Body Mass Index (BMI) individuals. In cancer patients, MBIs seem to have some effect on cytokine levels, although it was not possible to determine which specific cytokines were affected. One possibility is that MBIs might aid recovery of the immune system, increasing the production of interleukin (IL)-4 and decreasing interferon gamma (IFN-γ).
      CONCLUSIONS: MBIs may be involved in changes from a depressive/carcinogenic profile to a more normalized one. However, given the complexity and different contexts of the immune system, and the fact that this investigation is still in its preliminary stage, additional randomized controlled trials are needed to further establish the impact of MBI programmes on biomarkers in both clinical and non-clinical populations.

      PMID: 28231775 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Meditation and Hypnosis: Two Sides of the Same Coin? -
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      Meditation and Hypnosis: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

      Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2017 Apr-Jun;65(2):169-188

      Authors: Facco E

      Abstract
      Hypnosis and meditation, as a whole, form a heterogeneous complex of psychosomatic techniques able to control mind and body regulation. Hypnosis has been pragmatically used for limited therapeutic targets, while Eastern meditation has much wider philosophical and existential implications, aiming for a radical liberation from all illusions, attachments, suffering and pain. The available data on the history, phenomenology, and neuropsychology of hypnosis and meditation show several common features, such as the following: (a) induction based on focused attention; (b) capability to reach an intentional control of both biologic-somatic activities and conscious-unconscious processes;

      PMID: 28230460 [PubMed - in process]



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