Latest Mind-Body Medicine Research

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  • MIND-BODY MEDICINE IN THE LITERATURE
      PubMed Abstracts - Some citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites. [Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). NCBI Copyright and Disclaimers]
    • Yoga, Meditation and Mind-Body Health: Increased BDNF, Cortisol Awakening Response, and Altered Inflammatory Marker Expression after a 3-Month Yoga and Meditation Retreat. -
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      Yoga, Meditation and Mind-Body Health: Increased BDNF, Cortisol Awakening Response, and Altered Inflammatory Marker Expression after a 3-Month Yoga and Meditation Retreat.

      Front Hum Neurosci. 2017;11:315

      Authors: Cahn BR, Goodman MS, Peterson CT, Maturi R, Mills PJ

      Abstract
      Thirty-eight individuals (mean age: 34.8 years old) participating in a 3-month yoga and meditation retreat were assessed before and after the intervention for psychometric measures, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), circadian salivary cortisol levels, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Participation in the retreat was found to be associated with decreases in self-reported anxiety and depression as well as increases in mindfulness. As hypothesized, increases in the plasma levels of BDNF and increases in the magnitude of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) were also observed. The normalized change in BDNF levels was inversely correlated with BSI-18 anxiety scores at both the pre-retreat (r = 0.40, p < 0.05) and post-retreat (r = 0.52, p < 0.005) such that those with greater anxiety scores tended to exhibit smaller pre- to post-retreat increases in plasma BDNF levels. In line with a hypothesized decrease in inflammatory processes resulting from the yoga and meditation practices, we found that the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-10 was increased and the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-12 was reduced after the retreat. Contrary to our initial hypotheses, plasma levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines, including Interferon Gamma (IFN-γ), Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were increased after the retreat. Given evidence from previous studies of the positive effects of meditative practices on mental fitness, autonomic homeostasis and inflammatory status, we hypothesize that these findings are related to the meditative practices throughout the retreat; however, some of the observed changes may also be related to other aspects of the retreat such as physical exercise-related components of the yoga practice and diet. We hypothesize that the patterns of change observed here reflect mind-body integration and well-being. The increased BDNF levels observed is a potential mediator between meditative practices and brain health, the increased CAR is likely a reflection of increased dynamic physiological arousal, and the relationship of the dual enhancement of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine changes to healthy immunologic functioning is discussed.

      PMID: 28694775 [PubMed - in process]

    • The Mind Body-Wellness in Supportive Housing (Mi-WiSH) study: Design and rationale of a cluster randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi in senior housing. -
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      The Mind Body-Wellness in Supportive Housing (Mi-WiSH) study: Design and rationale of a cluster randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi in senior housing.

      Contemp Clin Trials. 2017 Jul 08;60:96-104

      Authors: Wayne PM, Gagnon MM, Macklin EA, Travison TG, Manor B, Lachman M, Thomas CP, Lipsitz LA

      Abstract
      Supporting the health of growing numbers of frail older adults living in subsidized housing requires interventions that can combat frailty, improve residents' functional abilities, and reduce their health care costs. Tai Chi is an increasingly popular multimodal mind-body exercise that incorporates physical, cognitive, social, and meditative components in the same activity and offers a promising intervention for ameliorating many of the conditions that lead to poor health and excessive health care utilization. The Mind Body-Wellness in Supportive Housing (Mi-WiSH) study is an ongoing two-arm cluster randomized, attention-controlled trial designed to examine the impact of Tai Chi on functional indicators of health and health care utilization. We are enrolling participants from 16 urban subsidized housing facilities (n=320 participants), conducting the Tai Chi intervention or education classes and social calls (attention control) in consenting subjects within the facilities for one year, and assessing these subjects at baseline, 6months, and 1year. Physical function (quantified by the Short Physical Performance Battery), and health care utilization (emergency visits, hospitalizations, skilled nursing and nursing home admissions), assessed at 12months are co-primary outcomes. Our discussion highlights our strategy to balance pragmatic and explanatory features into the study design, describes efforts to enhance site recruitment and participant adherence, and summarizes our broader goal of post study dissemination if effectiveness and cost-effectiveness are demonstrated, by preparing training and protocol manuals for use in housing facilities across the U.S.

      PMID: 28694204 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • What Is the Molecular Signature of Mind-Body Interventions? A Systematic Review of Gene Expression Changes Induced by Meditation and Related Practices. -
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      What Is the Molecular Signature of Mind-Body Interventions? A Systematic Review of Gene Expression Changes Induced by Meditation and Related Practices.

      Front Immunol. 2017;8:670

      Authors: Buric I, Farias M, Jong J, Mee C, Brazil IA

      Abstract
      There is considerable evidence for the effectiveness of mind-body interventions (MBIs) in improving mental and physical health, but the molecular mechanisms of these benefits remain poorly understood. One hypothesis is that MBIs reverse expression of genes involved in inflammatory reactions that are induced by stress. This systematic review was conducted to examine changes in gene expression that occur after MBIs and to explore how these molecular changes are related to health. We searched PubMed throughout September 2016 to look for studies that have used gene expression analysis in MBIs (i.e., mindfulness, yoga, Tai Chi, Qigong, relaxation response, and breath regulation). Due to the limited quantity of studies, we included both clinical and non-clinical samples with any type of research design. Eighteen relevant studies were retrieved and analyzed. Overall, the studies indicate that these practices are associated with a downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway; this is the opposite of the effects of chronic stress on gene expression and suggests that MBI practices may lead to a reduced risk of inflammation-related diseases. However, it is unclear how the effects of MBIs compare to other healthy interventions such as exercise or nutrition due to the small number of available studies. More research is required to be able to understand the effects of MBIs at the molecular level.

      PMID: 28670311 [PubMed - in process]

    • A Chinese Chan-based Mind-Body Intervention Improves Memory of Older Adults. -
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      A Chinese Chan-based Mind-Body Intervention Improves Memory of Older Adults.

      Front Aging Neurosci. 2017;9:190

      Authors: Chan AS, Cheung WK, Yeung MK, Woo J, Kwok T, Shum DHK, Yu R, Cheung MC

      Abstract
      There is growing interest in the adoption of lifestyle interventions to remediate age-related declines in memory functioning and physical and psychological health among older adults. This study aimed to investigate whether a Chinese Chan-based lifestyle intervention, the Dejian Mind-Body Intervention (DMBI), leads to positive benefits for memory functioning in older adults. Fifty-six adults aged 60 years or older with subjective memory complaints (SMC) were randomly assigned to receive the DMBI or a control intervention (i.e., a conventional memory intervention; MI) once a week for 10 weeks; 48 of the adults completed the intervention. Participants' verbal and visual memory functioning before and after the intervention were compared. In addition, changes in the participants' subjective feelings about their memory performance and physical and psychological health after the intervention were examined. The results showed that both the DMBI and MI resulted in significant improvements in both verbal and visual memory functioning and that the extent of the improvements was correlated with participants' level of performance at baseline. In addition, compared to the MI group, the DMBI group had significantly greater improvements in subjective physical and psychological health after the intervention. In summary, the present findings support the potential of the DMBI as an alternative lifestyle intervention for improving memory functioning, subjective physical and psychological health of older adults with SMC.

      PMID: 28659789 [PubMed - in process]

    • Feasibility of Mind-Body Movement Programs for Cancer Survivors. -
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      Feasibility of Mind-Body Movement Programs for Cancer Survivors.

      Oncol Nurs Forum. 2017 Jul 01;44(4):446-456

      Authors: Browning KK, Kue J, Lyons F, Overcash J

      Abstract
      PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate mind-body movement exercise (MBME) classes (yoga, tai chi, and Qigong) for cancer survivors. 
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      DESIGN: A single-group, repeated-measures design.
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      SETTING: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital in Columbus.
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      SAMPLE: 33 adult cancer survivors, with any cancer diagnosis, participating in MBME classes.
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      METHODS: The researchers sought to examine feasibility of multiple data collection time points and data collection measures; acceptability; and changes to physical, emotional, and biometric measures over time, as a result of participation in MBME classes.
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      MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Quality of life, sleep, depressive symptomatology, fatigue, stress, upper body strength, gait and balance, body mass index, heart rate, and blood pressure.
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      FINDINGS: The current study was feasible because survivors were willing to participate and completed most of the questionnaires. Participants found these classes to be beneficial not only for exercise, but also for social support and social connectedness. Poor sleep quality was consistently reported by participants. MBME classes should be recommended to survivors and are beneficial for oncology practices to offer.
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      CONCLUSIONS: Conducting MBME research with cancer survivors is feasible, and participants find the MBME acceptable and a way of addressing health and managing cancer-related symptoms.
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      IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses should help patients and caregivers identify locations and times when MBME class participation is possible, assess MBME class participation during each clinic visit to promote continued involvement and to understand if positive effects are occurring, and continue to provide support for MBME classes throughout the survivorship experience.

      PMID: 28632239 [PubMed - in process]

    • A Mind-Body Approach to Pediatric Pain Management. -
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      A Mind-Body Approach to Pediatric Pain Management.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Jun 20;4(6):

      Authors: Brown ML, Rojas E, Gouda S

      Abstract
      Pain is a significant public health problem that affects all populations and has significant financial, physical and psychological impact. Opioid medications, once the mainstay of pain therapy across the spectrum, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) guidelines recommend that non-opioid pain medications are preferred for chronic pain outside of certain indications (cancer, palliative and end of life care). Mindfulness, hypnosis, acupuncture and yoga are four examples of mind-body techniques that are often used in the adult population for pain and symptom management. In addition to providing significant pain relief, several studies have reported reduced use of opioid medications when mind-body therapies are implemented. Mind-body medicine is another approach that can be used in children with both acute and chronic pain to improve pain management and quality of life.

      PMID: 28632194 [PubMed - in process]

    • The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. -
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      The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

      Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2017 May 25;:

      Authors: Song R, Grabowska W, Park M, Osypiuk K, Vergara-Diaz GP, Bonato P, Hausdorff JM, Fox M, Sudarsky LR, Macklin E, Wayne PM

      Abstract
      PURPOSE: To systematically evaluate and quantify the effects of Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) on motor (UPDRS III, balance, falls, Timed-Up-and-Go, and 6-Minute Walk) and non-motor (depression and cognition) function, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).
      METHODS: A systematic search in 7 electronic databases targeted clinical studies evaluating TCQ for individuals with PD published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (Hedges's g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed by two raters.
      RESULTS: Our search identified 21 studies, 15 of which were RCTs with a total of 735 subjects. For RCTs, comparison groups included no treatment (n = 7, 47%) and active interventions (n = 8, 53%). Duration of TCQ ranged from 2 to 6 months. Methodological bias was low in 6 studies, moderate in 7, and high in 2. Fixed-effect models showed that TCQ was associated with significant improvement on most motor outcomes (UPDRS III [ES = -0.444, p < 0.001], balance [ES = 0.544, p < 0.001], Timed-Up-and-Go [ES = -0.341, p = 0.005], 6 MW [ES = -0.293, p = 0.06], falls [ES = -0.403, p = 0.004], as well as depression [ES = -0.457, p = 0.008] and QOL [ES = -0.393, p < 0.001], but not cognition [ES = -0.225, p = 0.477]). I(2) indicated limited heterogeneity. Funnel plots suggested some degree of publication bias.
      CONCLUSION: Evidence to date supports a potential benefit of TCQ for improving motor function, depression and QOL for individuals with PD, and validates the need for additional large-scale trials.

      PMID: 28602515 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Mind-Body Therapy for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. -
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      Mind-Body Therapy for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Apr 25;4(5):

      Authors: Herbert A, Esparham A

      Abstract
      Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pervasive among the pediatric population and new treatments with minimal adverse effects are necessary to be studied. The purpose of this article is to review current research studying mind-body therapies for treatment of children diagnosed with ADHD. Literature was reviewed pertaining to the effectiveness of movement-based therapies and mindfulness/meditation-based therapies for ADHD. Many positive effects of yoga, Tai Chi, physical activity, and meditation may significantly improve symptoms of ADHD among children.

      PMID: 28441363 [PubMed - in process]

    • Autism and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review. -
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      Autism and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review.

      J Altern Complement Med. 2017 May;23(5):331-339

      Authors: Hourston S, Atchley R

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Mind-body therapies are often used by people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, there has been little examination into which types of mind-body therapies have been investigated for people with ASD and for what purposes. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the existing evidence for mind-body therapies for people with ASD, particularly to determine the types of mind-body therapies used and the outcomes that are targeted.
      METHODS: PubMed, PsychInfo, and Scopus were searched using terms for ASD and mind-body therapies. Sixteen studies were selected for review; these studies tested interventions using mindfulness, meditation, yoga, Nei Yang Gong, and acceptance commitment therapy. Most study outcomes targeted behavior, psychological symptoms, and quality of life for children and adults with ASD as well as their parents.
      RESULTS: There was little overlap between studies on the types of mind-body therapies used and associated outcomes, and only three of the studies were randomized controlled trials. Most studies were small and uncontrolled. Some studies modified the mind-body therapies to increase accessibility for people with ASD.
      CONCLUSION: The evidence for mind-body therapies for people with ASD is limited and would benefit from larger randomized controlled trials.

      PMID: 28437148 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Investigating Clinical Benefits of a Novel Sleep-Focused Mind-Body Program on Gulf War Illness Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial. -
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      Investigating Clinical Benefits of a Novel Sleep-Focused Mind-Body Program on Gulf War Illness Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

      Psychosom Med. 2017 Jul/Aug;79(6):706-718

      Authors: Nakamura Y, Lipschitz DL, Donaldson GW, Kida Y, Williams SL, Landward R, Glover DW, West G, Tuteja AK

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: Mind-Body Bridging (MBB) has been shown to be effective for improving disturbed sleep. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the efficacy of sleep-focused MBB compared with sleep education control (SED) for improving sleep in previously deployed Gulf War veterans.
      METHODS: US military service members with sleep and physical health complaints who were deployed in 1990-1991 were randomized to receive three weekly sessions of either MBB (n = 33) or SED (n = 27) between 2012 and 2015. The primary outcome of Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale was completed at baseline, weekly during treatment, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, fatigue, quality of life, symptom severity, and mindfulness were completed at baseline, postintervention and 3-month follow-up. Salivary samples were collected at five time points per day at each visit for cortisol and α-amylase assessment. Clinician-administered assessments of sleep and co-occurring conditions were conducted at baseline and postintervention.
      RESULTS: MBB was significantly more efficacious than SED in reducing disturbed sleep at follow-up (F(1,180.54) = 4.04, p = .046). In addition, self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (F(1,56.42) = 4.50, p = .038) for the treatment effect, depression (F(1,93.70) = 4.44, p = .038), and fatigue symptoms (F(1,68.58) = 3.90, p = .050) at follow-up improved in MBB compared with those in SED. Consistently higher percentages of veterans in MBB reported improvements of sleep, pain, and composite sleep/general co-occurring symptoms at the postclinical evaluation, as compared with veterans in SED. Finally, the mean waking level of salivary α-amylase in the MBB declined to a greater extent than that in the SED, at follow-up (F(1,88.99) = 3.78, p = .055), whereas no effects were found on cortisol.
      CONCLUSIONS: Sleep-focused MBB can improve sleep and possibly also co-occurring symptoms in Gulf War veterans.
      CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01543997.

      PMID: 28406803 [PubMed - in process]

    • Online Training in Mind-Body Therapies: Different Doses, Long-term Outcomes. -
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      Online Training in Mind-Body Therapies: Different Doses, Long-term Outcomes.

      J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2017 Jan 01;:2156587217701857

      Authors: Kemper KJ, Rao N, Gascon G, Mahan JD

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: There is a high rate of burnout among health professionals, driving diverse attempts to promote resilience and well-being to counter this trend. The purpose of this project was to assess the dose-response relationship between the number of hours of online mind-body skills training for health professionals and relevant outcomes a year later.
      METHODS: Among 1438 registrants for online training (including up to 12 hours of training on mind-body practices) between December 2013 and November 2015, we analyzed responses from the first 10% who responded to an anonymous online survey between December 1, 2015 and February 1, 2016. Questions included the type and frequency of mind-body practice in the past 30 days and whether the online training had any impact on personal life or professional practice. Standardized measures were used to assess stress, mindfulness, confidence in providing compassionate care, and burnout.
      RESULTS: The 149 respondents represented a variety of ages and health professions; 55% completed one or more mind-body training modules an average of 14 months previously. Most (78%) engaged in one or more mind-body practices in the 30 days before the survey; 79% reported changes in self-care and 71% reported changes in the care of others as a result of participating. Increasing number of hours of training were significantly associated with practicing mind-body skills more frequently; increasing practice frequency was associated with less stress and burnout, which were associated with missing less work. Greater practice frequency was also associated with improvements in stress, mindfulness, and resilience, which were associated with increased confidence in providing compassionate care.
      CONCLUSION: Online training in mind-body therapies is associated with changes in self-reported behavior one year later; increasing doses of training are associated with more frequent practice which is associated with less stress, burnout, and missing work, and higher levels of mindfulness, resilience, and confidence in providing compassionate care. Additional studies are needed to compare mind-body skills training with other interventions designed to improve resilience and compassion while decreasing burnout in health professionals.

      PMID: 28403656 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Long-term benefits by a mind-body medicine skills course on perceived stress and empathy among medical and nursing students. -
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      Long-term benefits by a mind-body medicine skills course on perceived stress and empathy among medical and nursing students.

      Med Teach. 2017 Jul;39(7):710-719

      Authors: van Vliet M, Jong M, Jong MC

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: A significant number of medical students suffer from burnout symptoms and reduced empathy. This controlled, quasi-experimental study aimed to investigate whether a mind-body medicine (MBM) skills course could reduce perceived stress and increase empathy and self-reflection in medical and nursing students.
      METHODS: The MBM course (consisting of experiential sessions of mind-body techniques and group reflections) was piloted among Dutch medical students and Swedish nursing students. Main outcome variables were perceived stress (PSS), empathy (IRI subscales perspective taking, fantasy, empathic concern, and personal distress), and self-reflection (GRAS). Participating and control students completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention, at 6 and 12 months follow-up.
      RESULTS: Seventy-four medical and 47 nursing students participated in the course. Participating medical students showed significantly increased empathic concern [1.42 (95% CI 0.05, 2.78), p = 0.042], increased fantasy [3.24 (95% CI 1.58, 4.90), p < 0.001], and decreased personal distress [-1.73 (95% CI -3.04, -0.35), p = 0.010] compared to controls until 12 months follow-up. Participating nursing students showed significantly decreased levels of perceived stress [-5.09 (95% CI -8.37, -1.82), p = 0.002] and decreased personal distress [-5.01 (95% CI -6.97, -3.06), p < 0.001] compared to controls until 12 months follow-up.
      CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated long-term beneficial effects of the MBM course on perceived stress and empathy in medical and nursing students.

      PMID: 28395570 [PubMed - in process]

    • The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Feasibility Study. -
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      The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Feasibility Study.

      J Altern Complement Med. 2017 May;23(5):326-330

      Authors: Rodkjaer LO, Laursen T, Seeberg K, Drouin M, Johansen H, Dyrehave C, Hønge BL, Ostergaard L

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a stressful disease, and depression is the most common form of psychologic distress experienced by those infected. The aim of this study was to further develop and validate a mind-body intervention to improve coping self-efficacy strategies and increase mental health.
      DESIGN: Feasibility study, a randomized trial. Participants were assigned into two blocks (female/male) and simple randomization in a 1:1 ratio was performed within each block to one of two arms (1) intervention group, (2) control group who received usual care. Setting/Location and Subjects: The authors enrolled 30 HIV-infected individuals (10 women and 20 men) who had psychologic challenges and were motivated for working with personal development at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
      INTERVENTION: The intervention was a group intervention facilitated by an educated coach. The framework was a 3-day residential course plus two single-day/8-h follow-up events. The intervention was based primarily on a Native American philosophy of life and its understanding of how changes affect human beings and create imbalance.
      OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcomes were change in risk of depression and level of coping self-efficacy. Secondary outcomes were change in levels of stress and personal growth.
      RESULTS: Significant improvement between the intervention group and control group was seen in risk of depression and personal growth mean values from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements were shown within the intervention group in mean values of risk of depression, coping self-efficacy, stress, and personal growth. There were no significant improvements within the control group.
      CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that interventions designed to increase resilience through enhancing coping self-efficacy be used in conjunction with HIV medication to make this approach and especially the "whole-person" commitment a fully integrated aspect of HIV care.

      PMID: 28384006 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Perspectives on Technology-Assisted Relaxation Approaches to Support Mind-Body Skills Practice in Children and Teens: Clinical Experience and Commentary. -
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      Perspectives on Technology-Assisted Relaxation Approaches to Support Mind-Body Skills Practice in Children and Teens: Clinical Experience and Commentary.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Apr 04;4(4):

      Authors: Culbert T

      Abstract
      It has been well-established that a variety of mind-body (MB) techniques, including yoga, mental imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, and meditation, are effective at addressing symptoms such as pain, anxiety, nausea, and insomnia, as well as helping with a wide variety of medical, emotional, and behavioral issues in pediatric populations. In addition, MB skills can also be health promoting in the long-term, and with regular practice, could potentially contribute to longer attention spans, social skills, emotional regulation, and enhanced immune system functioning. Importantly, the benefits accrued from MB skills are largely dose dependent, meaning that individuals who practice with some consistency tend to benefit the most, both in the short- and long-term. However, clinical experience suggests that for busy patients, the regular practice of MB skills can be challenging and treatment adherence commonly becomes an issue. This commentary reviews the concept of technology assisted relaxation as an engaging and effective option to enhance treatment adherence (i.e., daily practice) for pediatric patients, for whom MB skills have been recommended to address physical and mental health challenges.

      PMID: 28375179 [PubMed - in process]

    • Mind-body medicine and lifestyle modification in supportive cancer care: A cohort study on a day care clinic program for cancer patients. -
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      Mind-body medicine and lifestyle modification in supportive cancer care: A cohort study on a day care clinic program for cancer patients.

      Psychooncology. 2017 Mar 31;:

      Authors: Jeitler M, Jaspers J, von Scheidt C, Koch B, Michalsen A, Steckhan N, Kessler CS

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: We developed an integrative day care clinic program for cancer patients focusing on mind-body techniques and health-promoting lifestyle modification (7-hour once-per-week group sessions over 12 weeks).
      METHODS: A cohort study design with a waiting group was implemented. Outcome parameters were assessed at the beginning, at the end of the active program, and at a 6-month follow-up. Patients waiting >4 and <12 weeks before treatment start were allocated to the waiting group and additionally assessed at the start of their day care program. Outcome measures included quality of life (FACT-G, FACT-B/C, WHO-5), fatigue (FACIT-F), depression/anxiety (HADS), and mood states (ASTS). A per protocol analysis using mixed linear models was performed.
      RESULTS: One hundred patients were screened on-site for eligibility. Eighty-six cancer survivors (83% female; mean age 53.7 ± 9.7 years; 49% breast cancer) were included into the study. Sixty-two patients were allocated to the intervention group and 24 patients, to the waiting group (mean waiting time 5 ± 1 weeks). Sixty-six data sets were included in the final analysis. Significant improvements were observed in favor of the intervention group after 12 weeks compared with the waiting group at the end of the waiting period for quality of life, anxiety/depression, and fatigue. Results from the 6-month follow-up for the whole study population showed lasting improvement of quality of life.
      CONCLUSIONS: The program can be considered as an effective means to improve quality of life, fatigue, and mental health of cancer patients. Moreover, it appears to have a sustainable effect, which has to be proved in randomized trials.

      PMID: 28370730 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • Mind-Body Interventions for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease. -
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      Mind-Body Interventions for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Apr 03;4(4):

      Authors: Yeh AM, Wren A, Golianu B

      Abstract
      Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa. There is emerging evidence that the brain-gut connection affects inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients more than previously thought. This is evidenced by comorbid mood disorders, irritable bowel symptoms concurrent with quiescent IBD, and the potential of psychosocial stressors to trigger IBD flares. Mind-body interventions such as psychotherapy, relaxation, mindfulness, biofeedback, yoga, and clinical hypnosis offer an adjunct to standard medical treatment for IBD. We will review the current evidence base for these mind- body interventions in the treatment of pediatric IBD, illustrate a case study, and offer suggestions for future research for this promising field.

      PMID: 28368365 [PubMed - in process]

    • The Cure That Lies Within: The Mind-Body Connection in Orthopaedics. -
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      The Cure That Lies Within: The Mind-Body Connection in Orthopaedics.

      Orthop Nurs. 2017 Mar/Apr;36(2):153-158

      Authors: Sullivan E, Hudson J

      Abstract
      The mind and the body are clearly intertwined in ways that are only now being discovered. In the orthopaedic world, injuries and diseases are often classified and described in a very organized, discrete fashion-The radius is fractured, the ACL or meniscus or rotator cuff is torn, the ankle is sprained, and/or the lumbar spine has a disc herniation. Although it is, in many ways, almost comforting to think about injuries or orthopaedic issues in this manner, what about the many patients who fail to fall into this classification? What about the thousands of patients with severe unexplained chronic pain or patients who just are not improving with the typical treatment algorithm. What about patients who present with multiple overlapping symptoms that do not fall into any of the classic diagnosis patterns? The mismatch between the actual health needs of typical patients and the standard acute medical response produces an immense waste of medical resources and incredible frustration for both the patient and the provider and creates a real risk that acute conditions will go untreated and become chronic. After more than a decade of traditional orthopaedic and musculoskeletal practice, its tremendous benefits as well as its limitations have become apparent. These limitations have sparked a search for integration of mind-body considerations to fill some of these gaps. Although this can prove to be quite challenging in today's healthcare world of maximizing volume and decreasing costs, it has proven to be an invaluable resource for both personal growth and patient and family satisfaction. The goals of this 2-part article are to dissect the relatively new concept of the mind-body connection in orthopaedics. The article aims to provide a framework that illustrates how the mind will predictably create objective observable phenomena in the body. The central focus of this framework is the role of the sympathetic nervous system and its effect on the chemistry, biomechanics, and appearance of various tissues in the body. Further identified are factors contributing to the aberrant emotional response as a means to empower practitioners and patients in recognizing the link between negative perception and observable symptoms. Our hope is to ultimately introduce a model of empowerment that when presented to a patient/family can produce a proactive response and, in turn, enhance current orthopaedic and pain management practices.

      PMID: 28358780 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind-Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints. -
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      Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind-Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints.

      Children (Basel). 2017 Mar 24;4(4):

      Authors: Sawni A, Breuner CC

      Abstract
      Mind-body medicine is a system of health practices that includes meditation/relaxation training, guided imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, yoga, art/music therapy, prayer, t'ai chi, and psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Clinical hypnosis is an important mind-body tool that serves as an adjunct to conventional medical care for the adolescent patient. Clinical hypnosis specifically uses self-directed therapeutic suggestions to cultivate the imagination and facilitate the mind-body connection, leading to positive emotional and physical well-being. There are many similarities between clinical hypnosis and other mind-body/self-regulatory modalities such as visual imagery, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and biofeedback that incorporate experiential learning and mechanisms for change. They may be viewed as subtypes of the hypnotic experience and share the common experience of trance as the entrée into self-empowered change in physiologic and psychological states. Clinical hypnosis can be used by health care providers to teach adolescents coping skills to deal with a wide variety of conditions such as chronic headaches, recurrent abdominal pain, anxiety, depression, grief and bereavement, phobias, anger, family stressors, sleep disorders, or enuresis. Clinical vignettes are given to help illustrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in adolescents.

      PMID: 28338644 [PubMed - in process]

    • Mind-Body Training for At-Risk Populations: Preventive Medicine at its Best. -
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      Mind-Body Training for At-Risk Populations: Preventive Medicine at its Best.

      Perm J. 2017;21:

      Authors: Elder C

      Abstract
      This article is a companion to "Transcendental meditation and reduced trauma symptoms in female inmates: A randomized controlled pilot study," available at: www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2017/6290-meditation.html, and on page 39 and to "Reduced trauma symptoms and perceived stress in male prison inmates through the Transcendental Meditation program: A randomized controlled trial," available at: www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2016/fall/6227-incarcerated-healthcare.html and in the Fall 2016 issue of The Permanente Journal.

      PMID: 28241906 [PubMed - in process]

    • Effects of mind-body interventions on depressive symptoms among older Chinese adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. -
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      Effects of mind-body interventions on depressive symptoms among older Chinese adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

      Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 May;32(5):509-521

      Authors: Bo A, Mao W, Lindsey MA

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of mind-body interventions in depressive symptoms treatment among older Chinese adults (>60 years of age).
      METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and Chongqing VIP for eligible studies until September 2016. We reviewed randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of mind-body interventions for depressive symptoms among Chinese older adults. Two authors independently conducted screening, and risk of bias assessment. Data were extracted by one author and crosschecked by the research team. Cohen's d standardized mean differences were calculated to represent intervention effects.
      RESULTS: A comprehensive search yielded 926 records; 14 articles met inclusion criteria. Relative to the control groups, mind-body interventions had large short-term effects in reducing depressive symptoms in older Chinese adults (standardized mean differences = -1.41; 95% CI [-1.82, -0.99]). Most studies did not report the long-term effects of mind-body interventions. Subgroup analyses by type of mind-body interventions, participants' age group, and control condition yielded different effect sizes; however, these differences did not all reach a statistically significant level. The interpretation of the subgroup analysis should be considered with caution given its observational nature and a small number of included studies.
      CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review suggests that mind-body interventions had short-term effects in alleviating depressive symptoms among older Chinese adults. Further research (randomized controlled trials with active controls and follow-up tests) are needed to assess the effects of mind-body interventions on depressive symptoms among this population. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

      PMID: 28220964 [PubMed - in process]



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