Latest Reiki Research

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  • REIKI IN THE LITERATURE
      PubMed Abstracts - Some citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites. [Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). NCBI Copyright and Disclaimers]
    • Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study. -
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      Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study.

      Holist Nurs Pract. 2016 Nov/Dec;30(6):368-378

      Authors: Sagkal Midilli T, Ciray Gunduzoglu N

      Abstract
      This study was conducted to determine the effects of Reiki on pain and vital signs when applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of the body after cesarean section surgery. The study was single-blinded, randomized, and double-controlled (Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups). Forty-five patients, equalized by age and number of births, were randomly assigned to the Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups. The treatment, which was applied to the patients in these 3 groups, was applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of body in the first 24 and 48 hours after the operation within 4 to 8 hours of the application of standard analgesics. The study data were collected using a patient follow-up form and a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups and times (P < .05). A reduction in pain of 76.06% was determined in the Reiki group patients between day 1 pre-tx and after application on the second day (day 2 post-tx) measurements. Mean breathing rate and systolic blood pressure measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups (P < .05). The Reiki group was observed to use fewer analgesics throughout the study and to need them after a longer time than the sham Reiki and control groups (P < .05). It was concluded that Reiki applied for 15 minutes to the incision area after a cesarean operation had the expected effects on pain and the need for the use of analgesics, but it had no effect on vital signs.

      PMID: 27763932 [PubMed - in process]

    • [THE GIFT OF THE APPLICATION OF REIKI THERAPY IN CANCER PATIENTS]. -
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      [THE GIFT OF THE APPLICATION OF REIKI THERAPY IN CANCER PATIENTS].

      Rev Enferm. 2016 Jun;39(6):38-49

      Authors: Sánchez Domínguez J

      Abstract
      Pain is one of the most feared symptoms of cancer. Bad pain not properly relieved contributes to the suffering of the patient and family. This may encourage them to seek additional complementary and alternative therapies, such as the one in our literature review. Reiki is understood as a healing method that uses universal energy to achieve balance and harmony of body, mind and soul, through the laying on of hands. Reiki is a relatively new the rapyin relation to the relief of the symptoms of cancer. In fact, there are still a few articles in this field. Currently, the authors explore the evidence on the effectiveness of Reiki in relation to cancer pain and symptom control. Due to the increased interest deposited in Reiki by the health professionals--especially for oncology professionals--to relieve the symptoms of cancer, there has been a synthesis of recent studies to provide the evidence so far. After our literature review, we can conclude that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of Reiki in relieving the cancer's symptoms due to the small sample size used, the paucity of studies and the abandonment of the study participants and others.

      PMID: 27548991 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Perceived relaxation as a function of restorative yoga combined with Reiki for cancer survivors. -
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      Perceived relaxation as a function of restorative yoga combined with Reiki for cancer survivors.

      Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2016 Aug;24:116-22

      Authors: DiScipio WJ

      Abstract
      AIMS & OBJECTIVES: Twenty-six cancer survivor volunteers participated in a study of the efficacy of perceived relaxation after performing restorative yoga combined with Reiki.
      RESULTS: Subjects scoring high ratings of Meaning and Peace in life demonstrated greater perception of depth of relaxation. A comparison of subjects receiving concurrent Reiki (19) and restorative yoga with those who only received restorative yoga (7) showed that Reiki subjects experienced greater perceived depth of relaxation than subjects who were not afforded the Reiki intervention. Non-Reiki participants also showed more difficulty overcoming intrusive fearful thoughts than the Reiki group.
      CONCLUSIONS: Clinical implications suggest that patients should be screened and treated for trauma-like symptoms including intrusive thoughts linked to anxiety and depression before referral to complementary programs that offer meditative or relaxation interventions.

      PMID: 27502811 [PubMed - in process]

    • The Effects of Yoga, Massage, and Reiki on Patient Well-Being at a Cancer Resource Center. -
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      The Effects of Yoga, Massage, and Reiki on Patient Well-Being at a Cancer Resource Center.

      Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Jun 01;20(3):E77-81

      Authors: Rosenbaum MS, Velde J

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Cancer resource centers offer patients a variety of therapeutic services. However, patients with cancer and cancer healthcare practitioners may not fully understand the specific objectives and benefits of each service. This research offers guidance to cancer healthcare practitioners on how they can best direct patients to partake in specific integrative therapies, depending on their expressed needs.
      OBJECTIVES: This article investigates the effects of yoga, massage, and Reiki services administered in a cancer resource center on patients' sense of personal well-being. The results show how program directors at a cancer resource center can customize therapies to meet the needs of patients' well-being.
      METHODS: The experimental design measured whether engaging in yoga, massage, or Reiki services affects the self-perceived well-being of 150 patients at a cancer resource center at two times.
      FINDINGS: All three services helped decrease stress and anxiety, improve mood, and enhance cancer center patrons' perceived overall health and quality of life in a similar manner. Reiki reduced the pain of patients with cancer to a greater extent than either massage or yoga.

      PMID: 27206308 [PubMed - in process]

    • Effects of Reiki With Music Compared to Music Only Among People Living With HIV. -
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      Effects of Reiki With Music Compared to Music Only Among People Living With HIV.

      J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):635-47

      Authors: Bremner MN, Blake BJ, Wagner VD, Pearcey SM

      Abstract
      Persons living with HIV (PLWH) often seek complementary treatments to improve their overall health and well-being. Reiki, an ancient healing practice, has been found to be effective in reducing symptoms of stress, anxiety, pain, and depression. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Reiki as a complementary treatment for PLWH. Using a two-group mixed-methods experimental design, 37 participants were randomized to either a 6-week Reiki with Music Group or a Music Only Group. Self-reported and physiologic measures were obtained at baseline, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks. Significant improvements in relief of pain and stress in those receiving RMG were found. At the 6-week assessment, semi-structured interviews were conducted with all participants. Qualitative findings indicated that Reiki and music therapy helped reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. Evidence-based data regarding the effectiveness of Reiki will help nurses help patients better manage HIV-related symptoms.

      PMID: 27184735 [PubMed - in process]

    • An exploratory study of reiki experiences in women who have cancer. -
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      An exploratory study of reiki experiences in women who have cancer.

      Int J Palliat Nurs. 2016 Apr 02;22(4):166-72

      Authors: Kirshbaum MN, Stead M, Bartys S

      Abstract
      AIMS: To explore the perceptions and experiences of reiki for women who have cancer and identify outcome measures for an intervention study.
      METHODS: A cross-sectional qualitative study of 10 women who had received reiki after cancer treatment was conducted. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and coded using framework analysis.
      RESULTS: Key themes identified were: limited understanding of reiki prior to receiving any reiki; release of emotional strain during reiki-feelings of a release of energy, a clearing of the mind from cancer, inner peace/relaxation, hope, a sense of being cared for; experience of physical sensations during reiki, such as pain relief and tingling; physical, emotional and cognitive improvements after reiki, such as improved sleep, a sense of calm and peace, reduced depression and improved self-confidence.
      CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that reiki could be a beneficial tool in the self-management of quality of life issues for women who have cancer.

      PMID: 27119403 [PubMed - in process]

    • Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study. -
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      Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

      Holist Nurs Pract. 2016 May-Jun;30(3):174-82

      Authors: Siegel P, da Motta PM, da Silva LG, Stephan C, Lima CS, de Barros NF

      Abstract
      The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment.

      PMID: 27078812 [PubMed - in process]

    • Reiki Therapy for Symptom Management in Children Receiving Palliative Care: A Pilot Study. -
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      Reiki Therapy for Symptom Management in Children Receiving Palliative Care: A Pilot Study.

      Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2016 Feb 07;:

      Authors: Thrane SE, Maurer SH, Ren D, Danford CA, Cohen SM

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Pain may be reported in one-half to three-fourths of children with cancer and other terminal conditions and anxiety in about one-third of them. Pharmacologic methods do not always give satisfactory symptom relief. Complementary therapies such as Reiki may help children manage symptoms.
      OBJECTIVE: This pre-post mixed-methods single group pilot study examined feasibility, acceptability, and the outcomes of pain, anxiety, and relaxation using Reiki therapy with children receiving palliative care.
      METHODS: A convenience sample of children ages 7 to 16 and their parents were recruited from a palliative care service. Two 24-minute Reiki sessions were completed at the children's home. Paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were calculated to compare change from pre to post for outcome variables. Significance was set at P < .10. Cohen d effect sizes were calculated.
      RESULTS: The final sample included 8 verbal and 8 nonverbal children, 16 mothers, and 1 nurse. All mean scores for outcome variables decreased from pre- to posttreatment for both sessions. Significant decreases for pain for treatment 1 in nonverbal children (P = .063) and for respiratory rate for treatment 2 in verbal children (P = .009). Cohen d effect sizes were medium to large for most outcome measures.
      DISCUSSION: Decreased mean scores for outcome measures indicate that Reiki therapy did decrease pain, anxiety, heart, and respiratory rates, but small sample size deterred statistical significance. This preliminary work suggests that complementary methods of treatment such as Reiki may be beneficial to support traditional methods to manage pain and anxiety in children receiving palliative care.

      PMID: 26858170 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    • [Effectiveness of implementing the reiki method to reduce the weaning failure. A clinical trial]. -
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      [Effectiveness of implementing the reiki method to reduce the weaning failure. A clinical trial].

      Enferm Intensiva. 2016 Apr-Jun;27(2):51-61

      Authors: Saiz-Vinuesa MD, Rodríguez-Moreno E, Carrilero-López C, García Vitoria J, Garrido-Moya D, Claramonte-Monedero R, Piqueras-Carrión AM

      Abstract
      INTRODUCTION: Admission to intensive care unit (ICU) is a difficult and stressful time for the patient, with the application of different techniques, such as intubation and ventilation support withdrawal or "weaning", which may fail due to anxiety.
      OBJECTIVES: To determine whether Reiki is useful in reducing weaning failure, as well as reducing the number of days of mechanical ventilation (MV), length of stay in ICU, amount of sedatives, amines, and antipsychotics.
      METHOD: Randomized clinical trial.
      SCOPE: ICU of a Level III University Hospital.
      POPULATION: ICU patients connected to Mechanical Ventilation for more than 48hours, with a signed informed consent. Patients in a terminal condition or potential organ donors were excluded.
      SAMPLE: 256 patients divided into two groups: intervention group (GI) and placebo (GP). The intervention involves the application of Reiki, and a simulated technique within the placebo group. An analysis was made of the absolute and relative frequencies, with a significance level of P<.05, 95% CI RESULTS: The percentage of failures at weaning was 9% in GI and 9.5% in GP (P=.42). The mean number of days on MV was 8.85 days for GI and 9.66 for the GP (P=.53). The mean dose of sedatives: GI 1078mg and 1491mg GP. The dose of Haloperidol was lower in the GI (5.30mg vs 16.81mg GP) (P=.03, 95% CI; -21.9 to -1.13).
      CONCLUSIONS: Reiki reduces the agitation of patients. A decrease was objectively observed in the number of days of Mechanical Ventilation, length of stay, lower doses of sedatives, and a slight decrease in the weaning failure in the GI. No statistically significant difference was found in the main variable.

      PMID: 26803374 [PubMed - in process]

    • Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations. -
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      Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations.

      Glob Adv Health Med. 2015 Nov;4(Suppl):58-66

      Authors: Jain S, Hammerschlag R, Mills P, Cohen L, Krieger R, Vieten C, Lutgendorf S

      Abstract
      Biofield therapies are noninvasive therapies in which the practitioner explicitly works with a client's biofield (interacting fields of energy and information that surround living systems) to stimulate healing responses in patients. While the practice of biofield therapies has existed in Eastern and Western cultures for thousands of years, empirical research on the effectiveness of biofield therapies is still relatively nascent. In this article, we provide a summary of the state of the evidence for biofield therapies for a number of different clinical conditions. We note specific methodological issues for research in biofield therapies that need to be addressed (including practitioner-based, outcomes-based, and research design considerations), as well as provide a list of suggested next steps for biofield researchers to consider.

      PMID: 26665043 [PubMed]

    • The use of self-Reiki for stress reduction and relaxation. -
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      The use of self-Reiki for stress reduction and relaxation.

      J Integr Med. 2015 Sep;13(5):336-40

      Authors: Bukowski EL

      Abstract
      OBJECTIVE: More than one-third of college students reported the desire for stress reduction techniques and education. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 20-week structured self-Reiki program on stress reduction and relaxation in college students.
      METHODS: Students were recruited from Stockton University and sessions were conducted in the privacy of their residence. Twenty students completed the entire study consisting of 20 weeks of self-Reiki done twice weekly. Each participant completed a Reiki Baseline Credibility Scale, a Reiki Expectancy Scale, and a Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) after acceptance into the study. The PSS was completed every four weeks once the interventions were initiated. A global assessment questionnaire was completed at the end of the study. Logs summarizing the outcome of each session were submitted at the end of the study.
      RESULTS: With the exception of three participants, participants believed that Reiki is a credible technique for reducing stress levels. Except for two participants, participants agreed that Reiki would be effective in reducing stress levels. All participants experienced stress within the month prior to completing the initial PSS. There was a significant reduction in stress levels from pre-study to post-study. There was a correlation between self-rating of improvement and final PSS scores. With one exception, stress levels at 20 weeks did not return to pre-study stress levels.
      CONCLUSION: This study supports the hypothesis that the calming effect of Reiki may be achieved through the use of self-Reiki.

      PMID: 26343105 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians. -
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      Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians.

      J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Aug;21(8):489-95

      Authors: Rosada RM, Rubik B, Mainguy B, Plummer J, Mehl-Madrona L

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Clinicians working in community mental health clinics are at high risk for burnout. Burnout is a problem involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Reiki is a holistic biofield energy therapy beneficial for reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to determine if 30 minutes of healing touch could reduce burnout in community mental health clinicians.
      METHODS: We utilized a crossover design to explore the efficacy of Reiki versus sham Reiki, a pseudo treatment designed to mimic true Reiki, as a means to reduce symptoms of burnout. Subjects were randomized to whether they started with Reiki or sham. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile Version 2 (MYMOP-2) were used as outcome measures. Multilevel modeling was used to represent the relations among variables.
      RESULTS: Reiki was statistically significantly better than sham Reiki in reducing burnout among community mental health clinicians (p=0.011). Reiki was significant in reducing depersonalization (p<0.001), but only among single people. Reiki reduced the primary symptom on the MYMOP also only among single people (p=0.03).
      CONCLUSIONS: The effects of Reiki were differentiated from sham Reiki. Reiki could be helpful in community mental health settings for the mental health of the practitioners.

      PMID: 26167739 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Effects of Distant Reiki On Pain, Anxiety and Fatigue in Oncology Patients in Turkey: A Pilot Study. -
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      Effects of Distant Reiki On Pain, Anxiety and Fatigue in Oncology Patients in Turkey: A Pilot Study.

      Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2015;16(12):4859-62

      Authors: Demir M, Can G, Kelam A, Aydıner A

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Fatigue, stress and pain are common symptoms among cancer patients, affecting the quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of distant Reiki on pain, anxiety and fatigue in oncology patients.
      MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants in the control group received usual medical and nursing care during their stay. The intervention group received usual care plus five distant Reiki sessions, one each night for 30 min. A face to face interview was performed and patient personal and illness related characteristics were evaluated using the Patient Characteristics form. Pain, stress and fatigue were evaluated according to a numeric rating scale.
      RESULTS: The experimental group was predominantly composed of women (71.4%), married individuals (40%), and primary school graduates (40%). The control group was predominantly male (72.7%), married (60%), and primary school graduates (60%). The control group demonstrated greater levels of pain (p=0.002), stress (p=0.001) and fatigue (p=0.001). The Reiki group pain score (p<0.0001), stress score (p<0.001) and fatigue score were also significantly lower.
      CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that Reiki may decreasepain, anxiety and fatigue in oncology patients.

      PMID: 26163604 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Feasibility of energy medicine in a community teaching hospital: an exploratory case series. -
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      Feasibility of energy medicine in a community teaching hospital: an exploratory case series.

      J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Jun;21(6):339-49

      Authors: Dufresne F, Simmons B, Vlachostergios PJ, Fleischner Z, Joudeh R, Blakeway J, Julliard K

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Energy medicine (EM) derives from the theory that a subtle biologic energy can be influenced for therapeutic effect. EM practitioners may be trained within a specific tradition or work solo. Few studies have investigated the feasibility of solo-practitioner EM in hospitals.
      OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the feasibility of EM as provided by a solo practitioner in inpatient and emergent settings.
      DESIGN: Feasibility study, including a prospective case series.
      SETTINGS: Inpatient units and emergency department.
      OUTCOME MEASURES: To investigate the feasibility of EM, acceptability, demand, implementation, and practicality were assessed. Short-term clinical changes were documented by treating physicians.
      PARTICIPANTS: Patients, employees, and family members were enrolled in the study only if study physicians expected no or slow improvement in specific symptoms. Those with secondary gains or who could not communicate perception of symptom change were excluded.
      RESULTS: EM was found to have acceptability and demand, and implementation was smooth because study procedures dovetailed with conventional clinical practice. Practicality was acceptable within the study but was low upon further application of EM because of cost of program administration. Twenty-four of 32 patients requested relief from pain. Of 50 reports of pain, 5 (10%) showed no improvement; 4 (8%), slight improvement; 3 (6%), moderate improvement; and 38 (76%), marked improvement. Twenty-one patients had issues other than pain. Of 29 non-pain-related problems, 3 (10%) showed no, 2 (7%) showed slight, 1 (4%) showed moderate, and 23 (79%) showed marked improvement. Changes during EM sessions were usually immediate.
      CONCLUSIONS: This study successfully implemented EM provided by a solo practitioner in inpatient and emergent hospital settings and found that acceptability and demand justified its presence. Most patients experienced marked, immediate improvement of symptoms associated with their chief complaint. Substantial practicality issues must be addressed to implement EM clinically in a hospital, however.

      PMID: 26035025 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial. -
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      Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

      Pain Manag Nurs. 2015 Jun;16(3):388-99

      Authors: Midilli TS, Eser I

      Abstract
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Reiki on pain, anxiety, and hemodynamic parameters on postoperative days 1 and 2 in patients who had undergone cesarean delivery. The design of this study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. The study took place between February and July 2011 in the Obstetrical Unit at Odemis Public Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Ninety patients equalized by age and number of births were randomly assigned to either a Reiki group or a control group (a rest without treatment). Treatment applied to both groups in the first 24 and 48 hours after delivery for a total of 30 minutes to 10 identified regions of the body for 3 minutes each. Reiki was applied for 2 days once a day (in the first 24 and 48 hours) within 4-8 hours of the administration of standard analgesic, which was administered intravenously by a nurse. A visual analog scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure pain and anxiety. Hemodynamic parameters, including blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse and breathing rates, and analgesic requirements also were recorded. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity (p = .000), anxiety value (p = .000), and breathing rate (p = .000) measured over time were found between the two groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the time (p = .000) and number (p = .000) of analgesics needed after Reiki application and a rest without treatment. Results showed that Reiki application reduced the intensity of pain, the value of anxiety, and the breathing rate, as well as the need for and number of analgesics. However, it did not affect blood pressure or pulse rate. Reiki application as a nursing intervention is recommended as a pain and anxiety-relieving method in women after cesarean delivery.

      PMID: 26025798 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Reiki for depression and anxiety. -
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      Reiki for depression and anxiety.

      Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 03;(4):CD006833

      Authors: Joyce J, Herbison GP

      Abstract
      BACKGROUND: Anxiety and depression affect many people. Treatments do not have complete success and often require people to take drugs for long periods of time. Many people look for other treatments that may help. One of those is Reiki, a 2500 year old treatment described as a vibrational or subtle energy therapy, and is most commonly facilitated by light touch on or above the body. There have been reports of Reiki alleviating anxiety and depression, but no specific systematic review.
      OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of Reiki for treating anxiety and depression in people aged 16 and over.
      SEARCH METHODS: Search of the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL - all years), the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR - all years), EMBASE, (1974 to November 2014), MEDLINE (1950 to November 2014), PsycINFO (1967 to November 2014) and AMED (1985 to November 2014). Additional searches were carried out on the World Health Organization Trials Portal (ICTRP) together with ClinicalTrials.gov to identify any ongoing or unpublished studies. All searches were up to date as of 4 November 2014.
      SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials in adults with anxiety or depression or both, with at least one arm treated with Reiki delivered by a trained Reiki practitioner.
      DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The two authors independently decided on inclusion/exclusion of studies and extracted data. A prior analysis plan had been specified but was not needed as the data were too sparse.
      MAIN RESULTS: We found three studies for inclusion in the review. One recruited males with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of non-metastatic prostate cancer who were not receiving chemotherapy and had elected to receive external-beam radiation therapy; the second study recruited community-living participants who were aged 55 years and older; the third study recruited university students.These studies included subgroups with anxiety and depression as defined by symptom scores and provided data separately for those subgroups. As this included only 25 people with anxiety and 17 with depression and 20 more with either anxiety or depression, but which was not specified, the results could only be reported narratively. They show no evidence that Reiki is either beneficial or harmful in this population. The risk of bias for the included studies was generally rated as unclear or high for most domains, which reduces the certainty of the evidence.
      AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to say whether or not Reiki is useful for people over 16 years of age with anxiety or depression or both.

      PMID: 25835541 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • The effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy. -
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      The effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy.

      J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2015 Jan;20(1):20-7

      Authors: Orsak G, Stevens AM, Brufsky A, Kajumba M, Dougall AL

      Abstract
      This pilot study examined the effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on improvements in quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy. Thirty-six breast cancer patients received usual care, Reiki, or a companion during chemotherapy. First, data were collected from patients receiving usual care. Second, patients were randomized to either receive Reiki or a companion during chemotherapy. Questionnaires assessing quality of life, mood, symptom distress, and Reiki acceptability were completed at baseline and chemotherapy sessions 1, 2, and 4. Reiki was rated relaxing with no side effects. Reiki and companion groups reported improvements in quality of life and mood that were greater than those seen in the usual care group. Interventions during chemotherapy, such as Reiki or companionship, are feasible, acceptable, and may reduce side effects.

      PMID: 25381189 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Initiating a Reiki or CAM program in a healthcare organization--developing a business plan. -
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      Initiating a Reiki or CAM program in a healthcare organization--developing a business plan.

      Holist Nurs Pract. 2014 Nov-Dec;28(6):376-80

      Authors: Vitale A

      Abstract
      Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) services, such as Reiki, continue to be offered to consumers in many hospitals and other health care organizations. There is growing interest among nurses, doctors, and other health care providers for the integration of CAM therapies into traditional settings. Health care organizations are responding to this need but may not know how to start CAM programs. Starting a Reiki program in a health care setting must be envisioned in a business model approach. This article introduces nurses and other health care providers to the basic concepts of business plan development and important steps to follow when starting a Reiki or CAM program.

      PMID: 25314111 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Biofield therapies and cancer-related symptoms: a review. -
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      Biofield therapies and cancer-related symptoms: a review.

      Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2014 Oct;18(5):568-76

      Authors: Gonella S, Garrino L, Dimonte V

      Abstract
      Patients with cancer can experience several treatment-related symptoms, and conventional care focuses primarily on cure and survival without a holistic approach to disease. Subsequently, an increasing number of patients are accustomed to complementary modalities to improve well-being. Biofield therapies (BTs) are complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities based on the philosophy that humans have an energetic dimension. Physical and psychological symptoms may cause imbalance, and BTs are believed to balance disturbance in the energy field. This article provides a study review of the main BTs (i.e., therapeutic touch, healing touch, and Reiki) in the treatment of cancer-related symptoms. Although BTs are among the most ancient healing practices, data on their effectiveness are poor and additional multicenter research with larger samples are necessary. BTs may eventually become an autonomous field of nursing activity and allow professionals to build a relationship with the patient, thereby improving motivation. The idea that this method can be self-managed and may effectively reduce pain for patients with cancer can improve satisfaction challenges experienced by the current healthcare system.

      PMID: 25253110 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    • Integrating Reiki and community-engaged scholarship: an interdisciplinary educational innovation. -
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      Integrating Reiki and community-engaged scholarship: an interdisciplinary educational innovation.

      J Nurs Educ. 2014 Sep;53(9):541-3

      Authors: Bremner MN, Bennett DN, Chambers D

      Abstract
      To provide students with a meaningful holistic care experience while integrating community-engaged scholarship, students partnered with a Reiki-prepared faculty member within a nurse-managed community clinic to offer Reiki to the clients and participate in the evaluation of the effectiveness of the modality. This article describes how students and faculty integrated holistic care, scholarship, and community engagement. This experience provided the students with an opportunity to embrace the art and science of holistic nursing while obtaining experience in measuring outcomes.

      PMID: 25138568 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



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